Squirrel Picnic

Handmade with Love and Stuff


26 Comments

Mayor Snack Frog Crochet Pattern

Crochet Mayor Snack Frog from The Big Acorn Race: A Story with Crochet Patterns and Projects

Mayor Snack Frog was the very first fatimal I ever crocheted. What’s a fatimal, you ask? A fatimal is, well, a fat animal. And at Squirrel Picnic, the fatimal clan is a bunch of fun-loving, easygoing, party animals. From their embroidered noses to their tiny little hands and feet, there’s just so much to love about them. They never consider their size to be a disadvantage. They never let anything get them down — they’re too busy having fun.

Of all the fatimals, Mayor Snack Frog could be considered the leader, but the truth is that there’s not really an organization to lead and fatimals aren’t much for being led anyway. In fact, he’s the one who gave himself the title of mayor. No one else seems to mind, so what the hoot. He has friends from all over the world who sometimes stop by to visit. He really does know how to throw a good party.

Mayor Snack Frog Crochet PatternDifficulty rating 1

Finished size without top hat: 6″ tall and 11 1/2″ around at the widest point
Finished size of top hat: 2″ tall and 12″ around the outside of the brim

Materials

(A) 85 yds worsted-weight yarn in green (Caron Simply Soft in Dark Sage, 6 oz [170 g] / 315 yds [288 m])
(B) 32 yds worsted-weight yarn in black (Caron Simply Soft in Black, 6 oz [170 g] / 315 yds [288 m])
(C) 5 yds worsted-weight yarn in light green (Caron Simply Soft in Pistachio, 6 oz [170 g] / 315 yds [288 m])
(D) small amount of worsted-weight yarn in white (Caron Simply Soft in White, 6 oz [170 g] / 315 yds [288 m])
G-6 (4.00 mm) crochet hook
Size 12 mm safety eyes
Polyester Fiberfill
Tapestry needle

Gauge

5 sts = 1″
5 rows = 1″

Instructions

Mayor Snack Frog Parts by Squirrel Picnic

Eyes (Make 2)

With D, ch 2.

Rnd 1: 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around, join with slst. (12)

FO. Weave in ends.

Set aside for now.

Eyelids (Make 2)

With A, ch 7.

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook and ea ch across (BL only is ok), ch 1, turn. (6)

Row 2: Sc, hdc, dc, hdc, sc, slst.

FO, leaving long tail for sewing.

Set aside.

Body

With A, ch 2

Rnd 1: 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook. (6)

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around. (12)

Rnd 3: * sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (18)

Rnd 4: * 2 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (24)

Rnd 5: * 3 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (30)

Rnd 6: * 4 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (36)

Rnds 7-15: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 16: * 5 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (42)

Rnd 17: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 18: * 6 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (48)

Rnd 19: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 20: * 7 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. (54)

Rnds 21-30: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 31: * 7 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (48)

Rnd 32: * 6 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (42)

Rnd 33: * 5 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (36)

Rnd 34: * 4 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (30)

Rnd 35: * 3 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (24)

Insert safety eyes into the center of the white eyes and attach to head. Sew eyelids to the frog’s head so that it wraps around the white part of the eye.

Stuff frog lightly.

Rnd 36: * 2 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (18)

Rnd 37: * Sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (12)

Rnd 38: * Sk, sc, rep from * 5 more times. (6)

Join with slst. FO, leaving a tail. Thread tail through remaining sts and pull to close. Weave in end.

Nose and Mouth

Using B, embroider two French knots for the nose and using a back stitch embroider a smile for the mouth.

Using C and back stitch, embroider an M above the nostrils and a line below the mouth to outline a snout.

Belly

With C, ch 2

Rnd 1: 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around. Slst in 1st sc to join. (12)

Rnd 3: Ch 1, * sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. Slst in 1st sc to join. (18)

Rnd 4: Ch 1, * 2 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. Slst in 1st sc to join. (24)

Rnd 5: Ch 1, * 3 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. Slst in 1st sc to join. (30)

Rnd 6: Ch 1, * 4 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times. Slst in 1st sc to join. (36)

FO, leaving long tail for sewing.

Sew to the middle of Mayor Snack Frog’s belly.

Feet and Hands (Make 4)

With A, ch 2.

Rnd 1: 4 sc into 2nd ch from hook. (4)

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around. (8)

Rnds 3-5: Sc in ea sc around.

Tuck in ends and press flat.

Row 6: Sc this closed with 3 scs (skipping the sts on either end where it is folded). Turn. (3)

Row 7: Ch 2, 2 dc in each of next 2 sc, (2 dc, ch 2, slst) in last sc.

FO, leaving a tail for sewing.

With the tail, thread through the 1st of the 3 sc in Row 6. Pull the thread up and over the dcs in Row 7 and back through the same space. Then thread through the 3rd sc in Row 6. Pull the thread up and over the dcs in Row 7 and back through the same space. Weave in to secure, but don’t trim just yet. (You’ll use the rest of the tail to sew the arms and legs to the frog.)

For feet, sew two of these to the bottom of the frog so that the toes stick out from under his belly. For hands, sew two of these to the sides of the frog so that the fingers reach out just in front of his belly.

Mayor Snack Frog's Top Hat by Squirrel PicnicTop Hat

With B, ch 2.

Starting at the flat top of the hat:

Rnd 1: 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around, join with slst, ch 1. (12)

Rnd 3: * sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (18)

Rnd 4: * 2 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (24)

Rnd 5: * 3 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (30)

Rnd 6: * 4 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (36)

Rnd 7: * 5 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (42)

Moving on to the sides of the hat:

Rnd 8: Sc in BL only of ea sc around.

Rnd 9: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 10: * 5 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (36)

Rnd 11: Sc in ea sc around.

Rnd 12: * 4 sc, dec, rep from * 5 more times. (30)

Rnds 13-15: Sc in ea sc around, join with slst, ch 1.

To create the brim:

Rnd 16: Sc in FL only of ea sc around, slst, ch 1.

Rnd 17: * 4 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (36)

Rnd 18: * 5 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (42)

Rnd 19: * 6 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (48)

Rnd 20: * 7 sc, inc, rep from * 5 more times, join with slst, ch 1. (54)

FO, weave in ends.


36 Comments

Make It! Challenge #8: Zombies in Love

Zombies in Love from Squirrel Picnic

My husband, Shelby, is the best. Since the start of Squirrel Picnic, he’s had to put up with crochet squirrels coming on vacation with us, weekends sacrificed to endless crochet craziness, and a living room that is almost always covered in yarn. He’s also been my best adviser, weighing in on everything from yarn color to construction. He has a very good mechanical mind. For these and so many other reasons, I am very pleased to be able to dedicate Make It! Challenge #8 to him — it’s well deserved and long overdue. And, yes, he advised me on everything for this project, even coming with me to the yarn shop to pick out zombie colors.

As you could probably already guess, for this challenge Shelby asked me to make him a zombie version of myself (a zombie self-portrait if you will). I set my heart on a few details from the start: an exposed brain with a flap of scalp, an eye that could pop out of the socket, and an arm that’s been cut off at the elbow. Of those three details, the eyes were the hardest, and I’m still not thrilled with how bug-eyed my zombie looks. So when I decided to make a zombie version of my husband to accompany the zombie version of me, I chose to simplify the construction of some of the details. Before I knew it, I had two very different patterns. The bodies and appendages are basically the same, but details like the eyes, brain opening, hair, and limbs are more complicated on the girl zombie. Have fun picking and choosing which details you like between the girl and boy zombies to make your zombie uniquely your own.

As a final note, I should mention that this pattern doesn’t include how to make clothing for your zombie. However, at the end of each pattern, I’ve listed links to the free sewing patterns I used to make my zombies’ clothes. Most 16” to 18” doll clothes patterns will fit your zombie, but do a fitting with the pattern before you start. There are a lot of free American Girl Doll clothes patterns online, and from what I could tell, most of them will fit your zombie with minimal tweaking.

As I type this, our zombies look very cute sitting on the couch together and holding hands. I’d love to see pictures of your zombies too! Send them to squirrelpicnic{at}gmail{dot}com or share them on Facebook.

Zombies in Love Crochet Patterns Continue reading


72 Comments

Make It! Challenge #7: Rainbow Donkey

Bill Brown’s comic The Evil Squirrel’s Nest, which he publishes on his blog Rainbow Donkey / Unicorn Crochet Pattern by Squirrel Picnicweekly on Thursdays, features a ragtag group of squirrels, skunks, cats, and various other wild animals who are always getting into something interesting. The main characters – Hooly, Odyssey, Hottie, Mini, and Clem – were all inspired by people Bill knows in real life. But of all the characters, the one most loved by fans is Rainbow Donkey, who is also the subject of this Make It! Challenge.

The story of how this “donkicorn” came to be is just as interesting as the character himself. Bill says:

Rainbow Donkey’s embarrassing debut appearance

Rainbow Donkey’s debut appearance

“The very first drawing of the ‘unicorn’ that would become Rainbow Donkey was a small avatar for my message board…. It was one of my first attempts to draw any member of the equine family, and to say it looked like complete crap is an understatement. Even my online friends, who were very encouraging of me for what at the time was some really bad art I was drawing, couldn’t help but point out how ridiculously awful the unicorn looked — with most of the replies being that it looked like a cow. In fact, Rainbow Cow was the first nickname being bandied about for it, but being as taken in by the real life Hooly as I was at the time, when she began calling it Rainbow Donkey, the name stuck… as did the character.”

I accepted Bill’s challenge both because I ES and SP Rainbow Donkeysadmire his work and just really like him as a person and because, much like Bill had never drawn a horse before Rainbow Donkey, I had never crocheted a horse/donkey/unicorn before. It turned out though that crocheting a donkicorn wasn’t the most difficult part. The toughest thing about this challenge was trying to capture that rough but loveable charisma that has made his donkicorn character so popular among fans. It might have something to do with his illustration style.

Bill does most of his sketching by hand, then uses MS Paint (I’m so impressed by anyone who has the patience to draw a comic in Paint!) and Photoshop to bring the images to digital life.

Click here to see how he draws his comics.

Click here to see how he creates his single-frame images in Paint too!

This process creates scenes that are bright and lively and, he admits, a little rough around the edges. I think that’s what makes them so endearing, and it was my biggest hope that I would be able to capture that quirky beauty in my crocheted version of Rainbow Donkey. I hope that you, too, can see the charm in his stubby feet, giant ears, and crooked smile. Because like Bill says, it’s our flaws that make us loveable.

Click here to read more of my interview with Bill.

And as always here’s my free pattern to make your very own…

Rainbow Donkey Continue reading